Organizing the Toy Box Can be a Learning Opportunity

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Organizing the Toy Box Can be a Learning Opportunity. Photo source: prweb.com

Preschool-aged children learn by doing. Cleaning out their toy box or closet may seem like drudgery to them, but if given an objective, the job can give them a sense of responsibility and pride. Giving your child this summer chore means they can start the school year off in an organized manner.

Have your child empty her toy box or closet. Provide her with three boxes for sorting. One box should be a box “to keep,” one should be “to donate,” and one should be “to throw away.” Explain to her that some children don’t have many toys and would appreciate the toys she doesn’t play with anymore. Knowing that the toys she is parting with can make someone else very happy can often encourage a giving spirit. Explain, also, that broken toys and pieces should be thrown away or recycled.

Allow your child to sort her toys herself, without your input. You can always review everything later, but giving her that responsibility will make her feel empowered. You can even set aside toys that you do not want your child to donate ahead of time.

Once your child has determined what should go in each of the boxes, help her organize everything she kept. Let her do most of the work so she feels a sense of responsibility for her own things. Take her to a shelter so she can see where her toys are going. The closer you can get her to the actual person who will receive the toys, the better.

This simple task of your preschooler cleaning out her toy box or closet helps develop her sense of responsibility, sorting skills, sense of generosity, and organizational skills. Plus, she’ll have a cleaner, more organized room for the start of the school year!

Why not start your child at Square Roots Preschool this fall?

Enroll in One or More Programs for the Preschool Experience That Fits Your Needs

Square Roots Preschool offers two-day programs for families who want to introduce their children to a school environment but still want to enjoy lots of time at home. Attending preschool two days a week is a great schedule for younger children who are starting school for the first time or even for older children whose family schedule does not require them to be enrolled in a full-time program. Due to the fact that our class size is so small and our students get a lot of individual attention and instruction, our part-time students develop all of the skills needed for success in kindergarten.

Alternatively, we are now offering a four-day program when families enroll in both two-day programs. This option is ideal for families who want their preschooler to have a bit more instruction time or if the family schedule makes this a necessity. We offer a 20% discount on the second program for a great cost-savings. 

We work with our families on an individual basis, so please come check us out and see which program fits your preschooler best. Call 480.447.ROOT to set up a tour.

Riddles are More Than Just Fun

Listening and evaluating clues from verbal directions is a skill that helps preschool-aged children gain meaning from the content of a book or story. Giving them opportunities to practice this skill will help them comprehend what they read or see.  Making up riddles for your child is a great way to exercise his mind to develop this skill. 

Make up riddles for your child to solve in the car, in the tub, or around the house. They can, at first, be related to your location so your child can pick up on visual cues, but as your child gets better at solving them, they can be more obscure. For example, if you’re in the bathroom, you could say, “You squeeze me. I clean your hair” (shampoo). Or “I am shaped like a pencil. I help you clean your teeth” (toothbrush). 

Getting your child to think about the characteristics of an object helps him think about what makes things unique. This activity will help with comprehension, listening, memory, attention span, and following directions.

Once your child gets the hang of it, have him make up riddles for you!

Come See What We’re About!

At Square Roots Preschool, we’re growing life-long learners.

Establishing strong roots is important for the future. Square Roots Preschool exists to provide a secure and stimulating early education experience that promotes each child’s social, emotional, physical and cognitive development. Our goal is to help grow a desire in children to be life-long learners.

Why Square Roots?

• secure, comforting transition from home

• small class size of 4 children (state ratio is 1:13) enables the teacher to have a powerful impact on each child’s development.

• degreed teacher and support staff

• on-staff consultants: early childhood development professor with over 40 years experience and degreed speech therapist

• healthy snacks, organic when possible

• nontoxic, natural environment free of harmful chemicals

• safe, stimulating outdoor play area

• ongoing, thorough communication with parents and opportunities for family involvement

We are now scheduling tours for fall enrollment for ages 2-5. Please call 480.447.ROOT or email taryn.squarerootspreschool@gmail.com for more information.

 

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The Act of Hand Washing as a Learning Opportunity

The most effective way to avoid illness and infection is frequent, thorough hand washing. But, let’s face it, proper hand washing is not the forté of most preschoolers, nor is it their favorite thing to do. The abstract idea that germs they can’t see might affect them or others adversely is a tough one to communicate. So what can we do?

The first step is to teach your child how to wash her hands properly. Use warm water, soap, and scrub all areas of the hands, remembering the nails and between the fingers. How long should you wash? Try a simple song to help your child time herself. Things to Share and Remember highlights a great one:

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Remind your child to wash her hands before eating or preparing food, after going to the bathroom, after outside play, or after coughing or blowing her nose.

Preschool-aged children love to create and admire their art, so work with your child to create your own reminders for your bathroom mirror. Small signs attached to the mirror that remind the family to wash their hands and the proper steps in order to do so. Your child can draw a picture and/or copy the words “wash hands.” Consider laminating the sign(s) so it holds up to bathroom moisture.

Allowing your preschooler to “own” their hand washing skills and feel confident will help them remember to wash their hands, and this activity helps teach word recognition, labeling, and proper hygiene.

Further reading:

A Lesson in Hand Washing

Discounts for Multiple Programs!

Square Roots Preschool is designed as a two-day program, but we are now offering enrollment in multiple programs, which gives our students an opportunity to delve deeper into a particular subject or have more practice with a topic or skill they may be struggling with. Our programs are designed so that students enrolled in one two-day program will be well prepared for kindergarten, but enrollment in multiple programs will provide a deeper foundation.

As our morning classes fill up, we will begin offering afternoon sessions, as well. Our goal is to offer our families a program that fits with their time and education desires.

Families enrolling their students in more than one program will receive a 20% discount on the second and subsequent programs!

We are a very small school, so check us out while there are still spaces available. Call 480.447.ROOT to schedule a tour!

Our Roll-call Tree: Pre-reading and Name Recognition

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Our Roll-Call Tree: Pre-reading and Name Recognition–Square Roots Preschool

Every morning at the beginning of circle time, we sing our welcome song and do roll call, which is also in the form of a song. We sing for each child present while that child plays the tambourine.

Ms. Taryn holds up a name and asks the class who’s name it is. With a little bit of practice, not only can the students recognize their own name, but also the names of other children in the class. And we know they’re not cheating by recognizing only the first letter because multiple students’ names begin with the same letter. They’re reading!

Once the students determine whose name is on the card, they get to carry their own name to our roll-call tree. All the names on the tree represent the students present in class that day.

This activity helps with letter recognition, name recognition, and builds reading skills. Plus, each of the students feel confident and welcomed by being the superstar with all of the attention for a brief period as everyone else sings to them and they hang their name on the tree.

And we all know who’s present!

Related reading:

Taking Charge of Chores Helps Develop Reading Skills